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This site is hosted by the Family and Friends of Dr. Mutulu Shakur, and is dedicated to one of the most prolific, committed and conscious freedom fighters and political prisoners to whom the Black liberation struggle has given birth.

Dr. Mutulu Shakur

Dr. Mutulu Shakur is a New Afrikan (Black) man whose primary work has been in the area of health. He is a doctor of acupuncture and was a co-founder and director of two institutions devoted to improving health care in the Black community.

Mutulu Shakur was born on August 8, 1950, in Baltimore, Maryland as Jeral Wayne Williams. At age seven he moved to Jamaica, Queens, New York City with his mother and younger sister. Shakur’s political and social consciousness began to develop early in his life. His mother suffered not only from being Black and female, but was also blind. These elements constituted Shakur’s first confrontation with the state, while assisting his mother to negotiate through the maze that made up the social service system. Through this experience, Shakur learned that the system did not operate in the interests of Black people and that Black people must control the institutions that affect their lives. Contine Reading »

U.S. Truth and Reconciliation Commission

“There is a need for a Truth and Reconciliation Commission in the U.S. to resolve the history of slavery, oppression, racism, segregation, lynching and the issues of political prisoners of the Civil Rights Black Liberation Struggle who fought against these gross human rights abuses…

We seek restorative justice and the immediate release of all of those who put their lives on the line for freedom and justice and thus have been languishing in prisons across America due to their political activities, associations and views…

A process that is developed on a Truth and Reconciliation Commission and/or the tribunals, has been the model used around the world. It allows for open discussion on the issue of resistance versus the state; it allows for a definition of terrorism that does not criminalize legitimate forms of resistance against oppression. It equally provides an avenue for healing and rebuilding, or at the very least, it provides a starting point post-conflict…

It’s important to acknowledge and understand that activists in our movement, who have made an effort to build support for political prisoners and prisoners of war in the U.S., have utilized and exhausted all available avenues that were open to them to gain relief for our freedom fighters…”
– Dr. Mutulu Shakur

“All of the political prisoner cases from the ’60s are a concern. Closing the unsolved lynchings is something that we’re still working on. It makes you wonder if the country isn’t coming to a place where we need some sort of truth and reconciliation commission to help us deal with what are very painful moments.” – Ben Jealous, NAACP President (2013) Contine Reading »

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